BreathDoc

1.

2.

Every time I scrape my tongue a lot of white smelly stuff comes off onto the scraper. It comes back in about half an hour. My breath always smells.

3.

Can you transfer your bad breath to other people by kissing them?

4.

Over the last several weeks I have noticed a strong mothball-like odour from my friend's breath. He has tried mouthwash but that seems to just mask the smell and it comes back shortly after he has rinsed.

5.

I'm sure my bad breath is becoming more noticeable and my dentist says that my gums and teeth are healthy. I don't know what to do about it.

6.

I have developed a white film on my tongue, along with chronic dryness in the mouth.  I brush regularly, use mouthwash and scrape my tongue every day, but the film comes back shortly afterward.  Does this film cause my breath to smell bad?

7.

I ordered the Halitox breath test today. When I have the results, can you tell me what kind of breath I have - Transient or Chronic?

8.

I'm using a chlorhexidine rinse to control bad breath, but now I have noticeable staining of the teeth and tongue that does not come off easily. Why am I having this problem, and is there anything I can do about it?

9.

Why is it that people can have favorable dental checkups although they have persistent halitosis?

   

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

1.

I have a white coating on my tongue and I always have a bitter taste in my mouth. What can I do to fix this?

 

First of all, you must practice good oral hygiene. Brush your teeth twice a day and scrape your tongue gently morning and evening. Always floss at least once a day. The best practise is to floss & brush after every meal. Visit your dentist regularly and make sure that your teeth and gums are in good health. These are always the prerequisites for a healthy mouth.

Sometimes, even though good oral hygiene and proper dental care are practiced, the bitter taste continues. I find that this is often the result of an imbalance of mouth bacteria and yeasts. My advice is to experiment with the products we have online to see if these will decrease the bad taste. Without an assessment this will be trial & error, but you might be lucky and find the right product for your personal oral imbalance. Often this is all that is necessary. However, in some cases, there may be a temporary improvement but the taste returns after a few weeks. Should this happen, I suggest that you make an appointment for assessment and treatment at an Oravital® Clinic near you. Once we determine exactly which bacteria are causing your odour, we can treat the problem very precisely.

BreathDoc

2.

Every time I scrape my tongue a lot of white smelly stuff comes off onto the scraper. It comes back in about half an hour. My breath always smells.

 

This substantial coating can form as a result of a large and imbalanced population of microorganisms in the mouth and on the tongue. Lack of flossing can increase the bacteria in the mouth and indirectly will add to the coating. Coating also forms more quickly when the person is under considerable stress or is not feeling well.

The smell comes from the byproducts the bacteria. The most common smells are hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan. The best way to reduce both the coating and the odours is to first practice good oral hygiene (see FAQ#1).

Try some of the rinses that are specifically formulated for the reduction of mouth odours. These powerful antibacterial rinses either destroy some of the bacteria or neutralize the odours. If this self-treatment fails, then you need to make an appointment for assessment and treatment at an Oravital® Clinic near you.

BreathDoc

3.

Can you transfer your bad breath to other people by kissing them?

 

Mouth bacteria are transferred to another individual through kissing and you receive his or her bacteria in exchange. Whether the bacteria that you transfer becomes a part of that person's oral population depends on several factors, including that person's genetic makeup.

We have had patients come to the clinic that feel they received their bad breath from kissing someone who had this condition.

If someone that you know has serious breath issues, it is best to tell him or her. That person may not know that the breath is offensive or just may not know what to do about it. This is an infection that may have harmful effects on mouth tissues. These bacteria can gain entrance into the body through the delicate tissues attached to the teeth and have the potential to cause systemic harm. Although it is very difficult in our society to talk about bad breath, it is in that individual's best interests (and perhaps your own as well) to gently tell him or her about the problem. You can mention BreathDoc.com and the Oravital® websites as places to get professional information about solutions for bad breath.

BreathDoc

4.

Over the last several weeks I have noticed a strong mothball-like odour from my friend's breath. He has tried mouthwash but that seems to just mask the smell and it comes back shortly after he has rinsed.

 

The mothball-like odour is caused by mouth bacteria and it is difficult to eliminate it by rinsing with ordinary mouthwashes. This strong odour often is found between the teeth but even with flossing it tends to come back quickly. Tell your friend to use a mouthwash that is formulated for bad breath. We have some professional-quality oral rinses in our online store. He should wet his floss with one of these rinses and floss all the teeth with a little extra in those areas that have the most odour (usually between the molars). He should gently scrape his tongue and then brush it with the mouthwash. If this is not successful, he should make an appointment for assessment and treatment at an Oravital® Certified Clinic.

BreathDoc

5.

I'm sure my bad breath is becoming more noticeable and my dentist says that my gums and teeth are healthy. I don't know what to do about it.

 

If your gums and teeth are healthy, your physician has ruled out any medical problems, and you're not on a low-carb diet, then the most common cause is an overgrowth of bad breath bacteria in the mouth. This overgrowth does not have a visible marker but leaves an odour. Breath becomes more noticeable over time as the bacteria continue to grow unchecked. Start by following the rules for good oral hygiene. Use an anti-halitosis mouthwash of your choice. Always rinse for a minimum of 30 seconds, and don't eat or drink for half an hour to let the rinse work.

For a catalogue of high quality antibacterial rinses that I recommend, click here. If improving your oral hygiene doesn't seem to help the problem, an assessment at an Oravital® Certified Clinic would be the next step.

BreathDoc

6.

I have developed a white film on my tongue, along with chronic dryness in the mouth.  I brush regularly, use mouthwash and scrape my tongue every day, but the film comes back shortly afterward.  Does this film cause my breath to smell bad?

 

Examine your tongue closely. Sometimes it appears as if there is a film but the paleness on the tongue comes from the velvety, finger-like papillae found on the tongue surface. These papillae give the tongue its velvety texture and are responsible for your tactile (feeling) sensations. If you look closely you will see that the tongue surface around each papilla is pink. As well, you will see tiny round, reddish bumps on the far back of the tongue surface - these are some of your taste buds. If your tongue matches this description, then this is normal for you.

If there is a true film on the surface, it is composed of microorganisms. It is possible that this film can cause your breath to have an odour. Because the film is retained in between the papillae as well as on top, it is difficult to remove it all. We have found that many individuals who have bad breath experience chronic dryness even though there is substantial saliva present. This dryness seems to be caused by the products that the microorganisms produce because once we rebalance the mouth, the dryness disappears.

After gently scraping, brush your tongue with an antibacterial mouthwash to decrease the surface bacteria. Don't eat or drink for 30 minutes afterward so the mouthwash can have time to take effect.

BreathDoc

7.

I ordered the Halitox breath test today. When I have the results, can you tell me what kind of breath I have - Transient or Chronic?

 

The tests themselves will not tell you if your breath is transient or chronic. However, if you repeat the tests at certain times during the week and these are consistently positive for sulfurs, then you can assume you have chronic bad breath. Many people have some bad breath occasionally - this is normal. To have sustained bad breath over a period of time is chronic. Do not take your samples when you have brushed and flossed but take them during the day (say late afternoon or first thing in the morning before brushing) to see when the odour is present and how strong it is.

BreathDoc

8.

I'm using a chlorhexidine rinse to control bad breath, but now I have noticeable staining of the teeth and tongue that does not come off easily. Why am I having this problem, and is there anything I can do about it?

 

Staining of teeth and tongue is common if you use a product with chlorhexidine in it. Chlorhexidine is an excellent antimicrobial and can control many of the mouth bacteria. It can only be purchased by prescription in the United States and Canada but is found on the shelf in the United Kingdom, many European countries and elsewhere. Chlorhexidine rinses (0.12% or 0.2%) usually look like water or may have a bit of pale blue or pale green dye added to the mixture. However, chlorhexidine is a dark brown material in its undiluted state. It is also substantive it sticks to tissues. Being substantive is a very good thing as the chlorhexidine remains in the tissues and biofilm over time and there is a slow release, generally over 6 to 12 hours. This means that the chemical works all that time. However, when it sticks to the biofilm or tongue, it can leave a dark stain for some individuals. Not everyone has staining from chlorhexidine. Chlorhexidine staining on the teeth can be removed because it is the plaque or biofilm that is stained, not the enamel. As far as the tongue is concerned, as the cells die off and are removed with a tongue cleaner or brush, the tongue will eventually return to normal.

BreathDoc

9.

Why is it that people can have favorable dental checkups although they have persistent halitosis?

 

Persistent halitosis is not a visible condition in most cases. When the mouth is checked for periodontal health, the signs of bacterial infection are often not obvious. There may be some bleeding when the gums are checked with a periodontal probe but this can easily be attributed to poor oral hygiene in those areas.

Dentists and dental hygienists wear masks to protect both the patient and themselves and it is not possible to detect odour through those masks. Even if they did not wear masks, it is not always easy to detect the odour because most people with halitosis have learned to breathe and to talk in a way that least exposes this problem. As well, prior to going to the dentist, most people with halitosis will brush and rinse and chew gum or mints right up to the appointment. These activities will temporarily mask the odour. Since the appointment is seldom longer than an hour, the odour may not be detectable. Further, if there is some small amount of odour, it can be attributed to stress at the appointment; stressful conditions can bring on some dryness and odour for everyone.

Lastly, the dental profession generally has not yet accepted halitosis as the serious condition that it is and continues to link it with the presence (or absence) of other conditions. Currently there is an increasing number of dental health professionals moving toward incorporating the oral-systemic model of healthcare - meaning that they now see persistent bad breath as a symptom of oral infection that can also affect systemic (entire body) health.

For a list of full-service dental clinics that treat bad breath, halitosis, bleeding gums and gum disease scientifically, effectively and non-surgically, visit oravital.com.

BreathDoc

   
   
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